Love our Elders


Affordable housing that is both accessible and and in a good location is crucial for for the quality of life for people of all ages but even more so for older adults (Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, 2014). In most household budgets, housing costs are the single largest item which causes it to directly affect peoples’ financial security and ability to plan for retirement (Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, 2014). As adults grow older, their physical and cognitive abilities become more limited making accessibility essential to their well-being (Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, 2014). Proximity to stores, services, and transportation becomes important because it allows older adults to remain active, maintain social relationships and meet their own basic needs (Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, 2014).

Although housing is important for their well being, housing has become less affordable for low income adults forcing many to spend less on necessities such as food and health care which creates problems for their health and well-being (Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, 2014). In 2014, the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University reported that one third of adults age 50 and above and 37 percent of adults age 80 and above spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing that may or may not meet their needs. With a large part of their income being devoted to housing costs, lower income adults age 50 and over spend 43 percent less on food and 59 percent less on health care (Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, 2014).

Many older adults who become disabled, live in homes that lack accessibility features such as a no-step entry, single floor living, extra-wide doorways and halls, electric controls and switches that are easily accessed, and lever-style door handles and faucet handles (Harvard 2014). The American Housing Survey reported in 2011 that only one percent of U.S. homes had each of these features (Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, 2014). This means that homeowners in certain parts of the country will have to make major modifications to their home if a disabled member wishes to remain in the home but these changes are for the most part more affordable than staying in a nursing home or assisted living facility for an extended period (Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, 2014).

Most older adults live in suburban and rural areas which makes it tough for them to shop, visit friends and family, and access services without having to drive (Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, 2014). The AARP reported in 2010 that one out of every five respondents 50-years-old and over sometimes or regularly missed activities they would like to attend because they placed limits on their driving or have given it up (Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, 2014). This causes social relationships to deteriorate isolating the older individual.

Affordable housing is important for everyone but for senior citizens, it is very crucial that it not only be affordable but accessible as well. Proximity to friends, family, stores, and health services is also important as. Without these, it is difficult for senior citizens to maintain their health, their relationships, and remain active. Here at T’s 4 Hope, we would like to bring attention to this issue and related issues as well to create discussion about what can be done to help those that need it most. We accept donations and volunteer work as well. If you are interested, please contact us at Ts4Hope@yahoo.com or 954-867-6765.

Reference:

Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, 2014.

Featured Posts
Recent Posts
Archive
Search By Tags
No tags yet.
Follow Us
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square

2020 T's 4 Hope